Carole McCurdy
just passing through: the disequilibrated map
1224 W Loyola Ave, Chicago IL
June 18, 2022 - June 25, 2022

Performances Saturday, June 18 at 7:30 PM + Sunday, June 19 at 2:30 PM
Projections June 20 to June 25 after dark



Can we be connected to a place that is not directly under our feet? The sense of location and belonging in a place is intermittent, and the sense of a place belonging to us is tangled with emotion, legalism, and appropriation. Maps always and by default involve distortion and misrepresentation. Subtracting a dimension, they suggest mystery or vacuum beyond the edges. This project plays with the possibilities of distorting the distortions, misrepresenting the misrepresentations, clinging to the edges. Partly it collapses into the nostalgia of pre-GPS maps: those AAA and National Geographic and Chamber of Commerce paper prophets, torn at the creases, arm-stretching, origamied, and with the strong option to re-fold incorrectly. On June 18 and 19, a movement-based performance will involve the artist marking, destroying, and remaking maps (with audience invited to participate if so desired).



Carole McCurdy is a Chicago-based artist whose work addresses grief and anxiety, duty and resistance, and the absurd mysteries of embodiment. She received a 2016 Lab Artist award from the Chicago Dancemakers Forum and was a Fall 2016 Sponsored Artist at High Concept Laboratories. She created and directed an ensemble piece, Waver, with support from CDF, HCL, and 3Arts Chicago. She has performed at spaces including the Chicago Cultural Center, Epiphany Dance, Links Hall, Hamlin Park, High Concept Laboratories, Defibrillator Gallery, and Movement Research (NY). For more information, please visit carolemccurdy.com.



Anatomy for Interiors
1224 W Loyola Ave, Chicago IL
June 11, 2022 - June 12, 2022

Performance Saturday, June 11 from 5-7 PM
On view 24-hours, starting Saturday at 12 PM

What is a space? How do we make it? Does it exist in our bodies, in architecture, or in between them? Using movement and music as primary mediums, Lia Kohl, Jasmine Lupe Mendoza, and Corey Smith explore these questions by identifying and reconfiguring the elements which create physical, ideological, and sonic space. The results of this practice are collected under the umbrella of Anatomy for Interiors.

This sprawling, 24-hour performance inside of Roman Susan is a structured improvisation shaped by the human actions of daily life — the eating, drinking, sleeping, working, fucking, exercising, and socializing that takes place inside of our rooms and our lives. At times playful, boring, and vulnerable, the work reimagines space and bodies as it is formed by space and bodies — 24-hours of incomplete glances at gesture and movement, shape and sound. The work will be visible from the street from noon on June 11 until noon on June 12. A public-facing performance will occur from 5-7pm on June 11th.



Jasmine Lupe Mendoza, Lia Kohl, and Corey Smith are multidisciplinary artists from Chicago, united in a shared curiosity for somatic, musical, and architectural practices.

Photo by Ricardo Adame.



Gary LaPointe Jr.
D O W N S H I F T
1224 W Loyola Ave, Chicago IL
May 14, 2022 - June 5, 2022

Open Hours Friday, Saturday, Sunday 1-5 and by appointment.



D O W N S H I F T is a solo exhibition of new sculptural objects and works on paper that unfold from a deconstructed crossover truck bed toolbox. Through the process of subtraction, this altered material object becomes a focal point as a frame and a scaffolded image of its previous self. The utility container that once kept its contents locked and secure is also no longer mobile and mounted on the bed of a pickup truck, but still signifies the potential for expansion, construction, labor, and value. This toolbox also acts as a footnote to the full-sized, heavy-duty pickup truck as a romanticized and rugged American symbol of class, gender identity, power, and freedom foiled by excess and hazardous warming emissions; among other forces. The extracted and off-casted materials and sheets of diamond-plated aluminum are recycled, shifted, and reformulated into new works and forms that offset these social and material constructs and question the systems, relationships, and rituals within them.



Gary LaPointe Jr. (1991 USA) graduated from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago with an MFA in Sculpture and was also awarded the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center in 2016. He had received his BFA from Lesley University College of Art and Design and was also a participant of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013. LaPointe has exhibited nationally and internationally with select solo and group exhibitions at Randy Alexander Gallery (Chicago) EVERYBODY Gallery (Chicago) Heaven Gallery (Chicago) Lunder Arts Center (Cambridge) Kunsthal Charlottenborg (Copenhagen) and the Royal Academy of Arts (London). He attended the Wassaic Projects Residency in 2019 and had also received a Purchase Award from the Working Artist Organization in 2020. LaPointe is a featured artist in 100 Sculptors of Tomorrow published in 2019 by Thames and Hudson and BEERS Gallery (London). He currently lives and works in Chicago, IL. For more information, please visit g a r y l a p o i n t e j r.

Chicago Must See | ARTFORUM - May 11, 2022

D O W N S H I F T exhibition guide (PDF)



A. P. Vague
Patterns for Diaspora
1224 W Loyola Ave, Chicago IL
April 2, 2022 - April 29, 2022

Patterns for Diaspora is an exploration of adornment, ornamentation, and the meaning found within repeatable patterns. This work is a kind of post-minimalist celebration of embellishments. As minimalist art tends to remove all traces of decoration in search of some formal purity, I want to take the opposite approach and work with patterns as elemental designs, complete in and of themselves.

I’m interested in exploring the way particular geometric arrangements can become emblematic of a given people or place. Scottish tartans, for example, can signify membership in a specific family, and various emblems often relate to distinct cultures. What does this mean today for people who have histories full of displacement, mobility, and change? I want to create new patterns specifically for members of diasporic communities, designs that are not linked to any given physical location but rather symbolic of complex layers of identity.

Modernist Adolf Loos famously compared ornamentation to crime in his 1908 essay on the topic. His perspective is thinly-veiled racism, an attempt to describe an ideal expression that removes all traces of marginal cultures. My project is an effort to defy this position by embracing the ornamental and creating forms that are not universal but imbued with the spirit of anyone who is a member of a diaspora.

— A. P. Vague



Open hours at 1224 W Loyola Ave will be by announcement and by appointment. Visitors to the exhibition are encouraged to leave their address, and a pattern will be delivered to them. Vector files of this work are available for download and use at archive.org. Printed fabric is also available.

A. P. Vague is a Chicago multimedia artist whose work explores long-distance communication and experimental collaboration. For additional information, apvague.wordpress.com.



Chicago Must See | ARTFORUM - March 31, 2022


Eileen Mueller
Woman of the Wolf
1224 W Loyola Ave, Chicago IL
March 7, 2022 - March 20, 2022

With rituals of communion as set and imagined dyke lands as setting, Woman of the Wolf is a spell cast in filmic form. This work invokes the phantasmagoric possibilities of imaging charged objects on film. The kitchen sink becomes a site of transmutation and a stick and poke tattoo forges a sigil.



Woman of the Wolf will be on view directly from the street, after dark.

Eileen Mueller makes work that honors the skill-sharing networks of early dyke organizers by using independent modes of production like hand processed 16mm film alongside performance and photography to conjure an unseen and wholly unknowable Dyke Mysticism that binds queered histories through spacetime. Eileen is one half of GURL DON’T BE DUMB which has curated shows and performances across the country. A co-founder of LATITUDE, Eileen worked to organize workshops, lectures, and panel discussions within a publicly accessible studio space. Eileen has shown at IM ERSTEN in Vienna, Austria; Higher Pictures in New York, NY; The Pitch Project in Milwaukee, WI; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Johalla Projects, and Roots & Culture in Chicago, IL. She has been awarded residencies at the Wassaic Project, ACRE, and the Institut für Alles Mögliche in Berlin. Eileen has shown at IM ERSTEN in Vienna, Austria; Higher Pictures in New York, NY; The Pitch Project in Milwaukee, WI; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Elmhurst Art Museum, Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Iceberg Projects, Roots and Culture, Ralph Arnold Gallery, and Johalla Projects in Chicago, IL. Her work is published in Phantoms In the Dirt, The Great Refusal: Taking on New Queer Aesthetics, and MAKE #16 “Archive.” She received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago. For more information, please visit eileenmueller.com.